• CREDIT HOURS: 2

    Be a part of the osteoporosis prevention model for the pediatric disease with geriatric consequences. Physical and Occupational Therapists alike can bring positive bone health strategies to school age children and their families. This introductory on-line course is designed for the health care professional that is interested in building knowledge of prevention strategies related to osteoporosis. It provides information and tools needed to take this wellness topic into an elementary school classroom and to modify the presentation format for any age group. The number one prevention against osteoporosis is building maximal bone density during childhood and adolescence. A PowerPoint presentation for elementary school children, along with recommendations for interactive classroom activities, is integrated into the course.

    You will learn about:

    • The anatomy and physiology of bone development
    • Healthy lifestyle choices that have a positive impact on bone growth
    • Interactive teaching methods that allow for positive learning and information retention

    Teaching methods include: text format, graphics, photos, video, interactive group activities, e-mail with instructor and case study of the pilot program. This course falls in AOTA Classification Codes: Category 1; Domain of OT and Category 2; Occupational Therapy Process.

    Course Goal: To help healthcare providers convey the importance of bone health in a variety of age groups in order to prevent osteoporosis in older age.

    Upon completion of this course the learner will be able to:
    • Identify positive and negative lifestyle choices related to attaining maximum bone density during childhood and adolescence
    • Describe normal bone metabolism
    • Utilize successful teaching methods to enhance learning during the “Healthy to the Bone” classroom program


  • CREDIT HOURS: 10

    Note: This course is a new, updated and visually enhanced version of our previous ABC's of Wheelchair Seating and Positioning course.

    Seating and Positioning has become a standard performance expectation of most rehabilitation therapists, particularly for those practicing in skilled nursing or pediatric settings. This course presents the fundamentals of seating and positioning for both pediatric and adult populations. The most commonly encountered situations and conditions are the focus; however, by understanding the basic fundamental principles involved in a seating and positioning intervention, the Learner should be able to resolve almost any seating and positioning problem caused by any condition for any client at any age.

    Teaching Methods include: course content delivered in a text format, graphics, PowerPoint slides, live web links, case studies, pictures, activities, discussion board and email to instructor. Midterm and final exams are of equal weight, and you must obtain a minimum passing score of 80%.

    Optimum positioning of the human body is paramount to successful function, including mobility and cognitive alertness. This introductory to intermediate level course is intended to provide the knowledge and skills that will enable you to identify a variety of actual or potential wheelchair seating problems, assess the fundamental causes for identified problems, and select the most appropriate, effective products and solutions for intervention.

    Learner Outcomes: Upon completion of this course, the Learner will be able to

    • List 3 functional benefits of proper seating and positioning for a wheelchair user in a Long Term Care facility
    • Identify 2 potential wheelchair candidates within clinical presentations (i.e. dining, restraint reduction, wound care programs) in need of seating and positioning intervention within Long-Term Care facility
    • List 3 potential sources of third-party funding for wheelchair modifications, accessories or components for payment of optimum seating and positioning
    • List the three (3) principles of seating and positioning which are Assessment, Body Alignment, and Comfort for pediatric candidates
    • List the 4 key elements of documentation necessary for reimbursement
    • After reading a case example regarding a potential wheelchair candidate; including clinical presentations, history, diagnosis, and functional level; the learner will correctly develop a seating and positioning intervention based on that information to promote functional independence within Long-Term Care facility.


  • CREDIT HOURS: 5

    Seating and Positioning has become a standard performance expectation of most rehabilitation therapists, particularly for those practicing in skilled nursing or pediatric settings.

    This course was specifically extracted from its original works ABCs of Wheelchair Seating and Positioning -- Assessment, Body Alignment and Comfort as a stand-alone course that will focus on the fundamentals of seating and positioning.

    Lessons and topics include the various benefits of proper seating & positioning that includes; medical, functional and personal benefits as it relates to patient programs where seating and positioning are essential (rehab dining, wound care, restraint reductions, pain management). The referral process; MD orders, evaluation, care plan, documentation and follow-up are covered, as well as principles of assessment, body alignment and control, as well as w/c terminology, types and dimensions necessary for clinical decision making.

    Target Audience and Teaching Methods
    This course is intended for intermediate learners, with evidence-based content delivered in a text format with graphics, web links, case studies, pictures, activities that support the learner objectives. Learners may email instructor to enhance learning opportunities.

    A Final exam is required with multiple attempts to obtain a minimum passing score of 80%. Learner must spend at least 80% of CE awarded time within the course material to be eligible to print the certificate of completion. Additionally, reading and resources for continued learning are provided within the course.

    Learning Objectives
    By the completion of this course, the student will meet the following objectives:

    • Describe the three (3) functional benefits of appropriate seating and positioning for a wheelchair user in a Long Term Care facility
    • Based on clinical case presented for seating and positioning intervention; interpret and design the best types of seating and positioning plans for a client.
    • List three (3) key evaluation components of a patient for Optimum seating intervention
    • List the three (3) principles of seating and positioning which are Assessment, Body Alignment, and Comfort for pediatric candidates


  • CREDIT HOURS: 5
    Course Description

    Seating and Positioning has become a standard performance expectation of most rehabilitation therapists, particularly for those practicing in skilled nursing or pediatric settings.

    This course was specifically extracted from its original works ABCs of Wheelchair Seating and Positioning -- Assessment, Body Alignment and Comfort as a stand-alone course that will focus on the practical application once you fully understand the fundamental mechanics of seating and positioning.

    Critical factors of comfort, wheelchair seat components, manual vs. powered mobility and other wheeled mobility. Learners will be provided with problems and solutions of seating and positioning as related to each skeletal component (pelvis, hips, spine/neck, head/neck, shoulder girdle, upper extremities…)

    The final lesson puts everything together related to funding in tandem with the details necessary in selecting the best devices for your clients’ needs. Additional reading & resources are provided after each lesson for continual study of this subject.

    Target Audience and Teaching Methods
    This course is intended for intermediate learners, with evidence-based content delivered in a text format with graphics, web links, case studies, pictures, activities that support the learner objectives. Learners may email to instructor for further enhance learning opportunities.

    A final exam is required with multiple attempts to obtain a minimum passing score of 80%. Learner must spend at least 80% of CE awarded time within the course material to be eligible to print the certificate of completion.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the completion of this course, the student will meet the following objectives:
    • Identify the two (2) clinical types of candidates appropriate for a seating and positioning intervention within a long term care facility
    • List four (4) general goals of a seating and positioning intervention
    • Analyze a number of different WC products and select the 2 best suited to meet the seating goals for a long term care resident.
    • List the four (4) key elements of documentation necessary for reimbursement
    • Identify three (3) potential sources for third-party funding of wheelchair modifications, accessories and components for seating and positioning
       
       

  • CREDIT HOURS: 1
    Course Description
    Occupational therapists who plan for the seating and wheelchair needs of children and adult patients strive for functional independence in all areas of daily living skills. The skills may be enhanced through the use of and gaining full access to the electronic communication devices available in today’s market.

    The primary focus of this module is on tablets because they can be safely attached to wheelchairs and support the other identified goals of therapists. Therapists should not only be aware of the varied demands, but have the knowledge and skills to provide solutions.

    This course gives a general overview of the kinds of communication equipment that will be of general interest to both adults and children and resources available for adapting this kind of equipment for wheelchair use.

    Adaptive equipment from several different companies will be presented for general consideration. References and resources are provided for further learning.

    Target Audience and Teaching Methods
    This course is intended for intermediate learners, with evidence-based content delivered in a text format with graphics, web links, pictures, activities that support the learner objectives. Final exam is required with multiple attempts to obtain a minimum passing score of 80%. Learner must spend at least 80% of CE awarded time within the course material to be eligible to print the certificate of completion.

    Learner Objectives
    By the completion of this course, the student will meet the following objectives:

    • Identify potential candidates and clinical presentations appropriate for a seating and positioning intervention related to the benefits of access to electronic communications devices.
    • Analyze and Assess what changes need to be made to provide optimum seating and positioning while making use of electronic communications devices.
    • Identify, compare and select resources for product(s) to meet determined goals.
    • Identify the role that cultural and family influences can play in determining acceptance of electronic communications devices.
       

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