• CREDIT HOURS: 8

    This Intermediate interactive course is designed to present an overview of hand function in terms of medical, educational, psychological, and anthropological perspectives, by reviewing these frames of reference: physiological, developmental, sensory integration, motor control, and the model of human occupation. Normal (typical) and atypical developmental sequences are first compared through clinical observations of video, photographs, and illustrations, and experiential lab learning experiences. Use of a prehension assessment and models of analysis are illustrated by a lifespan case study.

    Treatment strategies are integrated into areas of occupational performance such as ADLs, IADLs, education, play, leisure and social participation.

    Teaching Methods include
    course content delivered in text format, clinical observations of video, photographs, and illustrations, and experiential lab learning experiences.

    AOTA Classification Codes for Continuing Education Activities for this course are:

    Category 1: Domain of Occupational Therapy, Areas of Occupation and Performance Skills
    Category 2: Occupational Therapy Process, Evaluation and Intervention

    Course Goal: To provide an overview the basics of normal (typical) and atypical hand function.

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:

    • Discuss the contribution of historical and contemporary research in the fields of different disciplines to the study of hand development
    • Recognize the value of a broad base of theoretical frames of reference
    • Experience the foundational components of arm and hand development
    • Identify interruptions of normal arm and hand development that result in compensatory postures and movements
    • Select effective assessment procedures
    • Use assessment information to plan treatment

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor

  • CREDIT HOURS: 3

    Course Description
    This course is designed to present an overview of eye-hand coordination in terms of physiological, developmental, and functional perspectives, as well as an overview of a systems approach to assessment and task analysis.

    The relationships between the visual and fine-motor systems are first examined by identifying the components of eye-hand mechanisms separately and then together. The functional relevance of skill development for activities of self-help, play, and learning is correlated with areas of occupational performance such as ADLs, IADLs, education, play, leisure and social participation. Finally, the case method is used to apply an Operational Model for Eye-Hand Intervention and a Clinical Observations of Skill Development Model. Both models can be useful in gathering, analyzing, applying, synthesizing and evaluating data to guide treatment programs for children with a variety of disabilities.

    Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:
    • Understand the components of eye-hand mechanisms within several theoretical frames of reference
    • Discuss disorders of eye-hand coordination and functional implications in the home, school, and community
    • Select appropriate assessment instruments to collect relevant data
    • Use two proposed models to identify needs and recommend intervention strategies in environmental contexts

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor

  • CREDIT HOURS: 3

    Course Description

    This course is designed to present an overview of hand preference in terms of cultural, social, evolutional, historical, gender, genetic and environmental factors. Normal components of hand preference are examined from the perspectives of sensory-motor development and hemispheric specialization. Informal and formal assessments are illustrated by case studies, which then present examples of how “handedness” problems can be identified and managed.

    Course Goal: To offer a brief overview of current literature on the subject of hand preference and handedness and explore some interpretations of its relevance in clinical practice

    Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss the contribution of historical and contemporary research in the fields of different disciplines to the study of hand preference.
    • Experience the normal sequences of arm and hand development that contribute to the mature repertoire of unilateral and bilateral skills.
    • Give examples of the genetic, developmental, and environmental factors relating to handedness in non-disabled and disabled individuals.
    • Select effective assessment procedures.
    • Use assessment information to plan management.
    Click here for information about the Course Instructor

  • CREDIT HOURS: 3

    Course Description

    Is handwriting the problem or the symptom?

    This course attempts to answer that question by reviewing the literature about handwriting and visual-perceptual-motor function, describing a performance-based assessment/intervention model, and presenting a case study that illustrates the use of that model. The knowledge base presented includes both normal and atypical development of the entire body, because upper extremity functions require dynamic postural stability of the shoulder girdle on a stable trunk and independent movement of the head from the shoulders and the arms from the shoulders. Finally, the individual child's interests and current occupational roles are primary concerns, to ensure a level of motivation required for optimal cooperation and ultimate success.

    Course Goal: To present an overview of handwriting in terms of visual-perceptual-motor function, that is, a whole body performance perspective.

    Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:

    • Explain the theoretical foundations for visual-perceptual-motor problems affecting handwriting.
    • Experience simulated gross motor, fine motor, and oculomotor deficits that interfere with motor learning and skill development.
    • Adapt the performance-based assessment/intervention/maintenance model for home, school, or community environments.
  • CREDIT HOURS: 5

    Description:
    Teachers, families, and health professionals are increasingly seeking Occupational Therapists and Speech Pathologists to address children’s medical and behavioral feeding disorders. This beginner and advanced beginner course is for pediatric therapists interested in developing the foundation skills to provide comprehensive assessment and treatment within an interdisciplinary setting. 

    The student will be provided with information on: 
    • The anatomy and physiology of the swallow 
    • Normal oral motor and self feeding development
    • Behavioral and social aspects of feeding disorders,
    • Etiology and characteristics of dysphagia, food refusal, under-nutrition, and other common feeding disorders 
    • A sample therapeutic evaluation
    • Practical treatment strategies 

    Teaching methods are focused on promoting an interactive, lively learning experience with practical suggestions to enhance clinical problem solving. Course content delivered in text format, graphics, pictures, videos, live web links, experiential activities, discussion board, e-mail with instructor, and case studies. Grading is determined by one final exam with a minimum passing grade of 8

    Topics include: The International Classification of Functioning and Disability, Normal Eating and Feeding Skills, Aspects of Eating and Feeding, Common Feeding Disorders, Management of Feeding Disorders, Therapeutic Assessment, Promoting Full Participation in Mealtime Environments, Therapeutic Treatment of Body Level Feeding/Eating Impairments and Special Populations and Case Studies. 

    Course Goal: Participants in this course will develop an understanding of normal and abnormal aspects of oral motor skills and swallowing, and examine the developmental, psychosocial and cultural factors affecting children’s eating and feeding skills. The student will be able to develop informed evaluation and intervention strategies to promote safe eating/feeding skills, and to encourage children’s participation in positive mealtime environments at home, school, and the community. 

    Upon completion of this course, the Learner will be able to: 
    • Identify medical factors that contribute to pediatric feeding disorders. 
    • Distinguish between normal, delayed, and abnormal oral motor skills. 
    • Screen for aspiration during a clinical feeding assessment. 
    • Describe pediatric clinical and instrumental swallowing evaluations. 
    • Describe the contributions of the interdisciplinary medical team in the diagnosis and treatment of feeding disorders. 
    • Develop clinical evaluation strategies to assess oral motor skills, screen for swallowing problems, and identify common behavioral problems related to pediatric eating and feeding. 
    • Plan appropriate family centered, culturally sensitive intervention strategies for children with motor and behavioral feeding disorders.

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor

  • CREDIT HOURS: 6

    The instructor of this course is Rhoda P. Erhardt, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, who is well-known for her pioneer work in hand and vision development. Her first book, "Developmental Hand Dysfunction," containing the Erhardt Developmental Prehension Assessment, has been in print for more than 25 years, and is used in university occupational therapy programs and by clinicians throughout the world. She then continued her search for effective evaluation and intervention for children with multiple disabilities by creating and publishing the Erhardt Developmental Vision Assessment.

    This course is at an Introductory/Intermediate Level, designed for new practitioners as well as experienced practitioners who want to become more knowledgeable about visual development and dysfunction in children with multiple and developmental disabilities.

    Teaching methods include: course content delivered in text format, graphics, video clips, handouts, live web links, case studies, experiential labs, clinical observations and assignments. These activities provide interaction with the instructor and other students through the discussion board and private emails. Please note there is one required reading (to be purchased separately) that accompanies this course. Click above on the "Associated Media" icon for more information.

    Grading is a combination of participation through discussion and assignments (25%), case report (25%) and midterm and final exams (25% each). The cumulative score of all requirements must meet a minimum 80% passing score.

    Course Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of visual development from a multidisciplinary perspective, have an awareness of the nature and scope of visual problems in children and begin to develop strategies for assessment and treatment in natural contexts.

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon completion of this interactive online course, you will be able to:

    • Recognize and discuss the nature and scope of visual problems in children
    • Describe the contribution of theoretical frames of reference from different disciplines to the study of visual development
    • Compare and experience normal and atypical components of visual development, recognizing the relationships of normal and atypical visual function to gross and fine motor postural control and movement patterns
    • Identify interruptions of visual development, specific visual problems and implications for function
    • Select effective assessment procedures
    • Apply assessment data to intervention programs in home, school and community environments

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor
  • CREDIT HOURS: 12

    The instructor of this course is Rhoda P. Erhardt, MS, OTR/L, FAOTA, who is well-known for her pioneer work in hand development. Her first book, "Developmental Hand Dysfunction," has been in print for more than 25 years, contains the Erhardt Developmental Prehension Assessment, and is used in university occupational therapy programs and by clinicians throughout the world.

    This course is at an Introductory/Intermediate Level, designed for new practitioners as well as experienced practitioners who want to become more knowledgeable about hand development and dysfunction in children with multiple and developmental disabilities. Teaching Methods include course content delivered in text format, graphics, handouts, live web links, case studies, assignments, experimental labs and clinical observations.

    This course has a required accompanying download with video observation clips that demonstrate developmental stages, handouts, and the EDPA tool. Please click the "Associated Media" icon above for required materials.

    These activities provide you with interaction with the instructor and other students through the discussion board, class mailbox, chat room and email. Grading is a combination of participation, assignments (25%), case study report (25%), and midterm and final exams (25% each). The cumulative score of all requirements must meet a minimum 80% passing score.

    Upon completion of this course, pediatric practitioners will demonstrate the following Learner Outcomes:

    1. Incorporate the language of the World Health Organization NCMRR Model (National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research) into clinical thinking and documentation
    2. Appreciate the contribution of historical and contemporary research in the fields of different disciplines to the study of hand development
    3. Recognize the value of a broad base of theoretical frames of reference
    4. Experience the foundational components of arm and hand development
    5. Identify interruptions of normal arm and hand development that result in compensatory postures and movements
    6. Select effective assessment procedures
    7. Use assessment information to plan treatment
    8. Discuss disorders of eye-hand coordination, functional implications and intervention strategies
    9. Understand the genetic, developmental and environmental factors relating to handedness in non-disabled and disabled individuals, and criteria for intervention
    10. Describe the theoretical foundations for visual-perceptual-motor problems affecting handwriting, and a performance-based assessment/intervention/maintenance model.

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor

  • CREDIT HOURS: 13

    Note: This course is a new, improved and expanded version of our previous Sensory Integration course. Now includes more comprehensive information for all allied health rehab providers (OT, PT, SLP), plus a valuable treatment demonstration video clips of actual patients.

    This is an introductory to intermediate level course designed for the therapist who wants to develop foundational knowledge and treatment skills for working with children with Sensory Processing Disorders. The course provides essential, practical information which will enhance your ability to provide intensive, goal-directed and effective therapy to children with sensory challenges.

    A multi-sensory approach is used to enhance learning for the course participant:

    • Instructor lecture via web-based text
    • Live Web links
    • Text rich with photos of treatment techniques
    • Lab experiences provide opportunities to experience first hand what children with sensory dysfunction experience at a much greater level
    • Video clips of actual treatment sessions provide ideas and strategies for treating children with sensory processing deficits
    • Midterm and Final exams are multiple-choice. Each exam is of equal weight, and there is a required passing score of 80%.

    The initial lessons focus on understanding basic terms and theories behind sensory integrative treatment. Because an understanding of normal development is necessary to be able to identify atypical development, lessons on normal child development and development of central nervous system functions are included. Specific sensory systems, and their interrelationship to each other, are discussed in depth.

    Lessons then move quickly into a practical understanding of - and the differences among - various types of sensory processing disorders based on presenting symptoms. Evaluation tools are described, and clinical observations to supplement standardized evaluation tools are described and demonstrated.

    A variety of treatment techniques is demonstrated through pictures, text and video clips. Finally, topics such as dealing with behavior, home programs, and issues related to reimbursement bring this course full-circle from identification of the child with sensory processing issues, to discharge from therapy.

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor



  • CREDIT HOURS: 5

    Description:
    Teachers, families, and health professionals are increasingly seeking Occupational Therapists and Speech Pathologists to address children’s medical and behavioral feeding disorders. This beginner and advanced beginner course is for pediatric therapists interested in developing the foundation skills to provide comprehensive assessment and treatment within an interdisciplinary setting.

    The student will be provided with information on:
    • The anatomy and physiology of the swallow
    • Normal oral motor and self feeding development
    • Behavioral and social aspects of feeding disorders,
    • Etiology and characteristics of dysphagia, food refusal, under-nutrition, and other common feeding disorders
    • A sample therapeutic evaluation
    • Practical treatment strategies

    Teaching methods are focused on promoting an interactive, lively learning experience with practical suggestions to enhance clinical problem solving. Course content delivered in text format, graphics, pictures, videos, live web links, experiential activities, discussion board, e-mail with instructor, and case studies. Grading is determined by one final exam with a minimum passing grade of 8

    Topics include: The International Classification of Functioning and Disability, Normal Eating and Feeding Skills, Aspects of Eating and Feeding, Common Feeding Disorders, Management of Feeding Disorders, Therapeutic Assessment, Promoting Full Participation in Mealtime Environments, Therapeutic Treatment of Body Level Feeding/Eating Impairments and Special Populations and Case Studies.

    Course Goal: Participants in this course will develop an understanding of normal and abnormal aspects of oral motor skills and swallowing, and examine the developmental, psychosocial and cultural factors affecting children’s eating and feeding skills. The student will be able to develop informed evaluation and intervention strategies to promote safe eating/feeding skills, and to encourage children’s participation in positive mealtime environments at home, school, and the community.

    Upon completion of this course, the Learner will be able to:
    • Identify medical factors that contribute to pediatric feeding disorders.
    • Distinguish between normal, delayed, and abnormal oral motor skills.
    • Screen for aspiration during a clinical feeding assessment.
    • Describe pediatric clinical and instrumental swallowing evaluations.
    • Describe the contributions of the interdisciplinary medical team in the diagnosis and treatment of feeding disorders.
    • Develop clinical evaluation strategies to assess oral motor skills, screen for swallowing problems, and identify common behavioral problems related to pediatric eating and feeding.
    • Plan appropriate family centered, culturally sensitive intervention strategies for children with motor and behavioral feeding disorders.

    Click here for information about the Course Instructor
  • CREDIT HOURS: 3

    Course Description 

    Is handwriting the problem or the symptom?  

    This course attempts to answer that question by reviewing the literature about handwriting and visual-perceptual-motor function, describing a performance-based assessment/intervention model, and presenting a case study that illustrates the use of that model.  The knowledge base presented includes both normal and atypical development of the entire body, because upper extremity functions require dynamic postural stability of the shoulder girdle on a stable trunk and independent movement of the head from the shoulders and the arms from the shoulders.  Finally, the individual child's interests and current occupational roles are primary concerns, to ensure a level of motivation required for optimal cooperation and ultimate success. 

    Course Goal:  To present an overview of handwriting in terms of visual-perceptual-motor function, that is, a whole body performance perspective. 

    Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:  

    • Explain the theoretical foundations for visual-perceptual-motor problems affecting handwriting.
    • Experience simulated gross motor, fine motor, and oculomotor deficits that interfere with motor learning and skill development. 
    • Adapt the performance-based assessment/intervention/maintenance model for home, school, or community environments.